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Tag: BLM

Law Enforcement 1

Dallas BLM Leader Under Investigation for Domestic Violence, Claims It’s A “Private Matter”

alexander pic 2
Source: Facebook

Dominque Alexander has been a public figure and police critic for years in Dallas, Texas. In fact, the protest he organized and led on July 7, 2016, resulted in the deaths of five (5) Dallas area police officers. The deadliest attack on law enforcement since 9/11. I’m not blaming Mr. Alexander for what happened on that horrible July day. I’m simply highlighting the undeniable fact he’s been a public figure in Dallas for years. 

Despite all this time in the limelight, fighting for “transparency” and “accountability” for police officers, he inexplicably suggests a domestic violence complaint made against him is a “private matter.” Lee Merritt – a vocal civil rights attorney in Dallas – released a statement on Facebook today also suggesting it’s a private matter. However, Merritt was wise enough to acknowledge the fact Mr. Alexander is a public figure. Therefore, much like when police officers are accused of misconduct, such allegations become of a matter of public concern. 

A statement posted on Facebook by Lee Merritt regarding the allegation can be seen here:

Dominique Alexander doesn’t seem to realize how the “public figure” game works and feels we should effectively “mind our own business.” Apparently, accountability and transparency are apparently only applicable to public figures who wear badges.

Dominque made this known adding his own comment on Merritt’s Facebook statement. 

Private life

Is this guy serious? A private matter? I don’t think so sir.  

You CHOSE to be a public figure despite your background and issues in the past. That’s part of being a public figure. Welcome to the real world. 

I highly doubt the next time a police officer is accused of domestic violence, Lee Merritt or Dominque Alexander will rush to a podium, hold a press conference, or take to social media, to make a statement asking for everyone to “withhold judgement until due process can be carried out.” I doubt he will say that any prior discipline the police officer may have received in the past is irrelevant.

Why is it activists scream and yell on a daily basis calling for “transparency” and “accountability” but don’t seem to think it applies to them? 

Merritt ended his statement with, “We will not pile on as the family investigation begins to unfold.”

Well isn’t that convenient? Believe all accusers unless you’re the one being accused, do I have that right? I’m trying to wrap my head around how this activism game works with Mr. Merritt and Mr. Alexander. 

It’s interesting Mr. Merritt seems completely comfortable telling people to wait to pass judgement when it’s a fellow social justice activist accused of wrong doing. However, he has no issue with publicly and maliciously persecuting police officers based on an allegation alone.

Remember the DPS Texas Trooper accused of rape that caused national outcry and death threats toward the Trooper?

I do. 

Mr. Merritt was one of the first to break the false Trooper rape story and call for justice to be immediately served. Mr. Merritt took it further accusing the Texas Department of Public Safety of not following “proper protocols” asserting they were “protecting” the trooper accused of the horrific rape. Before any video was reviewed, or any facts had come out, Mr. Merritt had no issue at all accusing the Trooper AND the Texas Department of Public Safety of wrong doing. Mr. Merritt’s public release where he makes such assumptions and allegations early into the process can be seen below. 

As you may also remember, the entire allegation was proven false by the body camera footage and Mr. Merritt issued an apology with egg on his face. The death threats the Trooper received and the national embarrassment of such a horrible claim apparently made better by simply saying sorry. 

A few questions come to mind given Mr. Merritt’s track record of quick condemnation and allegation slinging against police officers on a national scale.

Why isn’t he condemning Mr. Alexander with the same relentless vigor before the facts come out as he does when it involves an allegation against police? Why in this case, must we withhold judgement and wait for the investigation to play out? Why isn’t Mr. Merritt attempting to push a narrative, create some anger, or organize an anti-domestic violence protest? Why does it seem they are incredibly selective on the justice they seek? Why doesn’t it apply across the board? 

The glaring bias and hypocrisy of both Mr. Merritt and Mr. Alexander are now on full display. 

I guess it’s rather obvious. They don’t really want justice for EVERYONE. They only want justice when it suits their agenda. Even in Mr. Merritt’s statement today, he inexplicably mentions race when condemning violence against women. “Violence against black women is intolerable.” he stated.

I understand the need for such specificity. I condemn violence against ALL women. I don’t care what their race happens to be. It’s wrong. No matter what. Period.

If the Texas DPS Trooper had in fact committed the horrible crime of which he was falsely accused, I’d have happily called for his immediate termination and punishment to the fullest extent of the law.

That’s how transparency and accountability are meant to work. 

You don’t get to pick and choose when those rules are applied, even if it makes your “team” look bad. 

As I’ve said multiple times regarding police officers and accountability. 

Support the good. Honor the fallen. Condemn the bad. 

This should apply to all public officials and persons who hold themselves out to be public figures, all the time. Not just when it’s convenient. That’s part of the gig. 

If the accusations against Mr. Alexander are proven to be false, then I will accept such findings. As of now, only two things are for certain: Dominque Alexander has been accused of domestic violence and the investigation is underway. 

We will see what happens and react accordingly. Like we should do with ALL accusations and investigations. No protests. No calling for punishment before we even know the facts. We wait and let the system do what it is designed to do, seek truth and justice.  

It’s really that simple. People should take note. 

The Officer Next Door

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Law Enforcement 11

An Open Letter to the Anti-Police Crowd

Dear Anti-Police Crowd,

Whether you believe me or not, I hear you when you voice your opinions and concerns about police officers. I support your right to peacefully march or protest for causes you believe in. I understand the emotions you feel when someone you care about dies at the hands of another. The truth is, we are more alike, than we are different.

I know what it’s like to bury someone you love, went to school with, or in my case, wore the same uniform. I understand the feelings you experience when you hear about the latest tragedy and think, “That could have been me.” It’s our worst nightmare, for both us. Like I said, we are more alike, than we are different.

I know how frustrating it is to be judged solely based on your appearance and not your character. I know I made a choice to wear this uniform, but the principle is the same. Nobody should be judged by appearance alone, it’s that simple. I ignore the dirty looks, the insulting comments, and the people who spit in my direction as I pass by. Whether you believe me or not, I go to work every day hoping to be a positive influence and strive to treat everyone the same.

We both want safe neighborhoods, the ability to succeed, and a fair justice system across the board. Like you, I want to see the bad guys go to jail and the good guys protected from violence and evil. I take it personal when someone is hurt or killed on my watch. I’ll give my life to save yours, whether you believe me or not, it’s true.

I can say this with absolute certainty, all good police officers despise the bad ones. When necessary, we have no issue with them being fired or sent to prison. There’s no place for a dirty or corrupt police officer in our profession. Their lack of integrity, poor decisions, or corruption, wipe away all the good we’ve done and erodes the vital trust of the community. This sentiment is shared across the entire profession, whether you believe us or not, we simply hate dirty police officers.

The truth is, police officers are human. Just like you, they can make mistakes. Despite their humanity, the highest standards of accountability are paramount. However, accountability must be a two-way street. Collectively, we must look at incidents objectively and assign blame fairly. If we approach our future with a willingness to walk in “each other’s shoes,” and learn from our mistakes, the progress we can achieve is endless. Through understanding, true change is possible.

Behind my badge is a heart like yours. In the end, we all want the same things.

I hope you see, we really are more alike, than we are different.

The Officer Next Door

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