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Tag: black lives matter

Law Enforcement 1

Dallas BLM Leader Under Investigation for Domestic Violence, Claims It’s A “Private Matter”

alexander pic 2
Source: Facebook

Dominque Alexander has been a public figure and police critic for years in Dallas, Texas. In fact, the protest he organized and led on July 7, 2016, resulted in the deaths of five (5) Dallas area police officers. The deadliest attack on law enforcement since 9/11. I’m not blaming Mr. Alexander for what happened on that horrible July day. I’m simply highlighting the undeniable fact he’s been a public figure in Dallas for years. 

Despite all this time in the limelight, fighting for “transparency” and “accountability” for police officers, he inexplicably suggests a domestic violence complaint made against him is a “private matter.” Lee Merritt – a vocal civil rights attorney in Dallas – released a statement on Facebook today also suggesting it’s a private matter. However, Merritt was wise enough to acknowledge the fact Mr. Alexander is a public figure. Therefore, much like when police officers are accused of misconduct, such allegations become of a matter of public concern. 

A statement posted on Facebook by Lee Merritt regarding the allegation can be seen here:

Dominique Alexander doesn’t seem to realize how the “public figure” game works and feels we should effectively “mind our own business.” Apparently, accountability and transparency are apparently only applicable to public figures who wear badges.

Dominque made this known adding his own comment on Merritt’s Facebook statement. 

Private life

Is this guy serious? A private matter? I don’t think so sir.  

You CHOSE to be a public figure despite your background and issues in the past. That’s part of being a public figure. Welcome to the real world. 

I highly doubt the next time a police officer is accused of domestic violence, Lee Merritt or Dominque Alexander will rush to a podium, hold a press conference, or take to social media, to make a statement asking for everyone to “withhold judgement until due process can be carried out.” I doubt he will say that any prior discipline the police officer may have received in the past is irrelevant.

Why is it activists scream and yell on a daily basis calling for “transparency” and “accountability” but don’t seem to think it applies to them? 

Merritt ended his statement with, “We will not pile on as the family investigation begins to unfold.”

Well isn’t that convenient? Believe all accusers unless you’re the one being accused, do I have that right? I’m trying to wrap my head around how this activism game works with Mr. Merritt and Mr. Alexander. 

It’s interesting Mr. Merritt seems completely comfortable telling people to wait to pass judgement when it’s a fellow social justice activist accused of wrong doing. However, he has no issue with publicly and maliciously persecuting police officers based on an allegation alone.

Remember the DPS Texas Trooper accused of rape that caused national outcry and death threats toward the Trooper?

I do. 

Mr. Merritt was one of the first to break the false Trooper rape story and call for justice to be immediately served. Mr. Merritt took it further accusing the Texas Department of Public Safety of not following “proper protocols” asserting they were “protecting” the trooper accused of the horrific rape. Before any video was reviewed, or any facts had come out, Mr. Merritt had no issue at all accusing the Trooper AND the Texas Department of Public Safety of wrong doing. Mr. Merritt’s public release where he makes such assumptions and allegations early into the process can be seen below. 

As you may also remember, the entire allegation was proven false by the body camera footage and Mr. Merritt issued an apology with egg on his face. The death threats the Trooper received and the national embarrassment of such a horrible claim apparently made better by simply saying sorry. 

A few questions come to mind given Mr. Merritt’s track record of quick condemnation and allegation slinging against police officers on a national scale.

Why isn’t he condemning Mr. Alexander with the same relentless vigor before the facts come out as he does when it involves an allegation against police? Why in this case, must we withhold judgement and wait for the investigation to play out? Why isn’t Mr. Merritt attempting to push a narrative, create some anger, or organize an anti-domestic violence protest? Why does it seem they are incredibly selective on the justice they seek? Why doesn’t it apply across the board? 

The glaring bias and hypocrisy of both Mr. Merritt and Mr. Alexander are now on full display. 

I guess it’s rather obvious. They don’t really want justice for EVERYONE. They only want justice when it suits their agenda. Even in Mr. Merritt’s statement today, he inexplicably mentions race when condemning violence against women. “Violence against black women is intolerable.” he stated.

I understand the need for such specificity. I condemn violence against ALL women. I don’t care what their race happens to be. It’s wrong. No matter what. Period.

If the Texas DPS Trooper had in fact committed the horrible crime of which he was falsely accused, I’d have happily called for his immediate termination and punishment to the fullest extent of the law.

That’s how transparency and accountability are meant to work. 

You don’t get to pick and choose when those rules are applied, even if it makes your “team” look bad. 

As I’ve said multiple times regarding police officers and accountability. 

Support the good. Honor the fallen. Condemn the bad. 

This should apply to all public officials and persons who hold themselves out to be public figures, all the time. Not just when it’s convenient. That’s part of the gig. 

If the accusations against Mr. Alexander are proven to be false, then I will accept such findings. As of now, only two things are for certain: Dominque Alexander has been accused of domestic violence and the investigation is underway. 

We will see what happens and react accordingly. Like we should do with ALL accusations and investigations. No protests. No calling for punishment before we even know the facts. We wait and let the system do what it is designed to do, seek truth and justice.  

It’s really that simple. People should take note. 

The Officer Next Door

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Law Enforcement 11

An Open Letter to the Anti-Police Crowd

Dear Anti-Police Crowd,

Whether you believe me or not, I hear you when you voice your opinions and concerns about police officers. I support your right to peacefully march or protest for causes you believe in. I understand the emotions you feel when someone you care about dies at the hands of another. The truth is, we are more alike, than we are different.

I know what it’s like to bury someone you love, went to school with, or in my case, wore the same uniform. I understand the feelings you experience when you hear about the latest tragedy and think, “That could have been me.” It’s our worst nightmare, for both us. Like I said, we are more alike, than we are different.

I know how frustrating it is to be judged solely based on your appearance and not your character. I know I made a choice to wear this uniform, but the principle is the same. Nobody should be judged by appearance alone, it’s that simple. I ignore the dirty looks, the insulting comments, and the people who spit in my direction as I pass by. Whether you believe me or not, I go to work every day hoping to be a positive influence and strive to treat everyone the same.

We both want safe neighborhoods, the ability to succeed, and a fair justice system across the board. Like you, I want to see the bad guys go to jail and the good guys protected from violence and evil. I take it personal when someone is hurt or killed on my watch. I’ll give my life to save yours, whether you believe me or not, it’s true.

I can say this with absolute certainty, all good police officers despise the bad ones. When necessary, we have no issue with them being fired or sent to prison. There’s no place for a dirty or corrupt police officer in our profession. Their lack of integrity, poor decisions, or corruption, wipe away all the good we’ve done and erodes the vital trust of the community. This sentiment is shared across the entire profession, whether you believe us or not, we simply hate dirty police officers.

The truth is, police officers are human. Just like you, they can make mistakes. Despite their humanity, the highest standards of accountability are paramount. However, accountability must be a two-way street. Collectively, we must look at incidents objectively and assign blame fairly. If we approach our future with a willingness to walk in “each other’s shoes,” and learn from our mistakes, the progress we can achieve is endless. Through understanding, true change is possible.

Behind my badge is a heart like yours. In the end, we all want the same things.

I hope you see, we really are more alike, than we are different.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 0

Media Headlines Matter

 

Kap Kneeling
Colin Kaepernick, right, and Eric Reid kneeling during the national anthem before an N.F.L. game last year. Credit Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press

Today there was yet another news article published somewhere in the United States about the shortage of police applicants in their jurisdiction. Admittedly, I didn’t read the article. The headline stated what we already know, or at least what any reasonable person would suspect. People aren’t applying to be police officers anymore. At least not at the rate they did in the past. (If you could see me as I write this, I’m displaying my best shocked face).

This shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone who hasn’t been living under a rock for the past four years. Since the Ferguson, Missouri police shooting and the subsequent riots and protests that swept the nation, police officers across the country have been labeled nothing short of racist and blood thirsty monsters. By and large, thanks to the mainstream media in this country. Why? The answer is simple. The controversy surrounding policing in the recent years has made them money. Sadly, it’s that simple. The more people protested, marched, and held rallies, the more the media could give them the microphone to stir the controversy. The more controversial a topic gets, the more clicks, views, and revenue they make. Their job is to make money. Nothing gets more views than something controversial.

How do I know this? I know from experience in writing and posting articles like this one on my website and social media platforms. The number of “views, clicks, or shares” articles get, seem to be directly correlated to the photo or title that accompanies the article. To test this, I’ve posted the exact same article with two different photos and guess which one got more traction? The one with the more controversial and sad photo. Same article. Same title. Different photo. Completely different results in readership. The photo and title I choose for this article will be relevant the first time I post it. Then the following day I will repost it with an even more controversial person in the photo, I’m almost certain, the results will be completely different. We will see how it affects readership and I will update this article. I don’t like or want to be controversial. I started this to be honest, truthful, and give officers a voice. Their side of the story if you will. But, sometimes controversy happens.

Conclusion, the more sad or controversial an article title or photo appears, the more “clicks, reads, or views” it garners. So maybe we as consumers are also to blame? Apparently, America just loves controversy and sadness. This may all be true, but it doesn’t remove responsibility from the mainstream media to be mindful on how they report facts and stories, or worse, how they choose to skew them.

Basically, media headlines matter.

The narrative they push matters and has direct and tragic real life consequences when they create hate that leads to police being ambushed and killed like in Dallas on July 7th, 2016. Other consequences are less tragic, but equally concerning when it comes to the lack of police applicants nationwide. Soon, there will be a crisis. I’m calling it now. Unless the economy crashes and people are in dire need of jobs, police applications will remain low, continually pushing police departments to levels that put officers and the public at risk. Who honestly wants to work holidays, weekends, and be called a monster for doing your job for $60,000 a year? Not to mention the obvious dangers associated with the job.

Sadly, the mainstream media doesn’t care about the repercussions of their controversy creating headlines. They don’t care if people who once strongly desired to be a police officer, are now rethinking their career choice. Can you blame them? After over a decade of wearing the uniform myself, in one of the largest cities in the country, my simple answer is, NO. I don’t blame them. In fact, I think it is wise to really question your desire to be a police officer in 2018 and beyond. If you really, really, want to be one, then do it. Because those are usually the best ones. It’s not just a job, a paycheck, or something you should do half-assed. It’s a serious job, with lifelong consequences for you, your family, and everyone you deal with. If it’s nothing more than a paycheck to you, you’re likely the kind of officer I wish never became one. They generally seem to become officers that make negative headlines in legitimate way.

Buzzwords like “police reform” now flood media headlines and political rallies because somehow “they” believe “they” can change the fact that every day police officers confront the violence most people deny exists. Yet somehow, “they” get upset when the confrontation turns deadly. Well, let’s keep speaking the truth, “they” only get upset if the police officer survives and a citizen dies. However, if the officer happens to be one race and the deceased another, CHACHING!!! Time for an inflammatory headline! Let’s not worry about the facts or circumstances surrounding the incident, publish that inflammatory headline! To hell with the consequences! Who cares about the facts or the fact the entire incident was on video and  likely justified!? Profit through division. Tell me I’m wrong.

Sadly, no matter how many community events police plan, cute lip-sync videos are made, or ice cream cones are handed out in the summer. One even remotely controversial police shooting and we are back to square one with the help of the media. Police are quickly painted with a wide accusatory brush suggesting that because of ONE particluar incident, we must remind you that ALL police are racist, blood thirsty monsters! It’s like a sad game of chutes and ladders.

Meanwhile police recruiters hastily hold up signs at a job fairs, “Sign up folks! Come join the team! It’s the greatest show on earth! Let’s make a difference! You can help people!” Come on, let’s stay on the honesty train. Times have changed and your good intentions no longer matter. It’s now all about what the media headlines say that define police officers’ actions. The media doesn’t care if you are the best officer to ever wear the uniform, never been disciplined, or have 58 medals pinned on your chest. Ultimately, when given the chance you, the American police officer will be crucified to their benefit.

To my knowledge there’s never been a protest or rally after a police officer was shot and killed. If there has been, please enlighten me, because I am unaware of such an incident. Vigils don’t count. Police haters generally spew the usual despicable response when an officer is killed, “That’s what they signed up for.” Get real. No one signs up to die.

I’ll be the first to say, dirty or racist cops of any kind should be fired and go to prison if warranted. The recent 3 year prison sentence of a Police Chief for framing African Americans for crimes they didn’t commit was too short. The punishment should have been harsher for ruining people’s lives, betraying the trust of society, and tarnishing the badge. His despicable acts have consequences for everyone involved and the damage is permanent and likely irreparable. For that, he should’ve been punished more harshly.

To conclude, I will say this. Police officers don’t become police officers to get rich. They don’t become police officers to hurt people. They genuinely view their job as a way to keep the evil from hurting the good. They know their role is to hold those accountable for THEIR bad decisions. Becoming a police officer, is a way to serve their community and bear burdens of which most people are blissfully unaware. They don’t go into notoriously violent communities – no matter what the racial makeup may be – looking to hurt someone.

The next time you hear about a fatality car accident with multiple people killed, a deadly shooting, or any horrific tragedy, pause for a minute and ask yourself, would you want to be the one rushing to that scene? Do you want to see the dead bodies sprawled across the highway? Do want to see the person taking their last breath after being shot by a rival gang member? How would you feel about the fact the media is able to portray you as a monster or an inherent racist with a few simple keystrokes, despite knowing nothing about you? Despite the fact you rush to those scenes without knowing or caring about the race of the victim. You just want to HELP. Would you be able to handle it? Again, I think we know the answer. When you think about it in these terms, the nationwide police application shortage comes as no surprise. There is an elephant in the room. The question is, how long until it reaches a critical point?

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door 

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