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Tag: Bad Police

Law Enforcement 0

The Truth About Dirty Cops

Officer in cuffs

There’s nothing worse than a dirty or corrupt police officer.

I’ll say it again for the people in the back and those stuck in “we hate the police” echo chambers, THERE’S NOTHING WORSE THAN A DIRTY POLICE OFFICER!

It’s been said multiple times, but one thing I’ve learned writing police related articles on this website and running multiple police related social media pages, people honestly believe police officers support, protect, or shield the dirty ones.

The truth is, they couldn’t be more wrong. Apparently, this topic needs to be addressed more often and more clearly, so people stop believing such falsities and mistruths about the policing profession.

It’s easy to hate a group or profession if you convince yourself they’re ALL corrupt and part of a conspiracy.

Changing the narrative and shining the light on the police profession’s hatred for corrupt police officers isn’t an easy one. It’s a lofty goal, I realize that. I’m fighting the media and other “sub-groups” who have much more reach and influence on society than I do.

That won’t stop me from writing articles trying to fight the anti-police narrative, in hopes of making our communities and police officer’s safer. If you read this and appreciate the message, do me a favor and share it. It’s the only way the message will get out. We can’t let the false narratives win and allow the target on our first responders backs to remain, simply because no one stood up and said the truth.

So here we go.

If you truly think the 1% of dirty or corrupt police officers represent the profession as a whole, or worse, the 99% support or embrace the dirty 1%, ask yourself this question: What do police officers nationwide stand to gain by protecting bad and dirty cops?

I’ll tell you, NOTHING.

Why?

For starters, this is 2019. Nearly everything we say or do is on video. Whether it’s from body cameras strapped to the officer’s own chest or surveillance cameras nearly everywhere in public, you’re likely on video more than you realize. This holds especially true for police officers. This is a good thing. Police officers should be held to the highest standards and the public is not wrong for having an extremely high expectation of professionalism and honest conduct. The point is, because we are always on camera, eventually, a bad police officer will be found out and it will come to light. It’s inevitable. Like the officer in New Jersey in my previous article, his bad actions were bound to see the light of day eventually, so protecting such a vile, corrupt, excuse of a police officer, serves no purpose. 

If it’s on video like the New Jersey hospital incident was, two things should happen. First, the officer should be immediately fired. Second, they should be punished to the fullest extent of the law. Double the prison sentence while you’re at it. Yes, you read that right. Double their sentence if they’re found guilty, ESPECIALLY if it’s on video. There’s nothing to debate, if it’s on video. They of all people should know better, so they should be punished more harshly. If the max is 20 years, give them 20 years. Ten years for breaking the law and the second ten years for disgracing the badge and making the job of the good ones more difficult and dangerous. I have no problem with that. I don’t speak for all police officers, but I can only imagine they share this sentiment. If only the police haters knew how much the good ones despise the crooked and dirty police officers. I hope they’re listening.

Unfortunately, despite all of these facts, people walk around in a “bubble” with the belief police officers nationwide are party to a huge conspiracy called the “thin blue line of silence.” Even in 2019 with cameras everywhere, on police officer’s chests, in their squad cars, and cameras in every citizen’s pocket, people think officers will stop at nothing to protect one another. Maybe decades ago, when everything was decided solely on witnesses and testimony of those involved and nothing more. I realize body cameras are not a 100% corruption ending invention, but as I mentioned, there’s almost always another set of “eyes” watching you. Police officers are human and therefore susceptible to being imperfect or corrupt. It’s true. However, I believe we’ve come a long way and officers collectively hate dirty police officers and actively work to get rid of them. 

The more prevalent cameras become, the more and more police officers are being held accountable, especially internally. Police officers are now going to prison for bad shootings and civil rights violations. Officers are now testifying openly about what was “right” or “wrong” which ultimately helps prosecute dirty police officers. A much needed change for law enforcement as a profession. It’s here. It’s happening. It will continue to happen. For the betterment of everyone involved.

Ask any police officer, “What the most stressful part of the job?” I can almost guarantee they instantly answer, “Internal discipline and punishment from the command staff.” It’s not running toward gunfire, it’s not searching a building with a possible armed suspect inside, it’s the internal accountability. Why? It has an effect on promotions, pay raises, being able to work overtime, the list goes on. Officers are always under scrutiny, when in the streets and back at their police stations. Just because the public doesn’t see the internal accountability for police officers, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Maybe that should change? I don’t know. That’s beyond my pay-grade.

If a police officer is corrupt, dirty, or flat out criminal, there’s only one place for them, prison. It’s really that simple. This clearly needs to be said more often. I have no issue saying it, in hopes it prevents deadly ambushes like what took place in Dallas and Baton Rouge in 2016.

Maybe this message will gain traction and those who need to hear it most, will attempt to look at things with some semblance of objectivity and honesty about the way things actually are in the policing profession.

One can hope.

Support the good. Honor the fallen. Condemn the corrupt.

The Officer Next Door

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Law Enforcement 11

An Open Letter to the Anti-Police Crowd

Dear Anti-Police Crowd,

Whether you believe me or not, I hear you when you voice your opinions and concerns about police officers. I support your right to peacefully march or protest for causes you believe in. I understand the emotions you feel when someone you care about dies at the hands of another. The truth is, we are more alike, than we are different.

I know what it’s like to bury someone you love, went to school with, or in my case, wore the same uniform. I understand the feelings you experience when you hear about the latest tragedy and think, “That could have been me.” It’s our worst nightmare, for both us. Like I said, we are more alike, than we are different.

I know how frustrating it is to be judged solely based on your appearance and not your character. I know I made a choice to wear this uniform, but the principle is the same. Nobody should be judged by appearance alone, it’s that simple. I ignore the dirty looks, the insulting comments, and the people who spit in my direction as I pass by. Whether you believe me or not, I go to work every day hoping to be a positive influence and strive to treat everyone the same.

We both want safe neighborhoods, the ability to succeed, and a fair justice system across the board. Like you, I want to see the bad guys go to jail and the good guys protected from violence and evil. I take it personal when someone is hurt or killed on my watch. I’ll give my life to save yours, whether you believe me or not, it’s true.

I can say this with absolute certainty, all good police officers despise the bad ones. When necessary, we have no issue with them being fired or sent to prison. There’s no place for a dirty or corrupt police officer in our profession. Their lack of integrity, poor decisions, or corruption, wipe away all the good we’ve done and erodes the vital trust of the community. This sentiment is shared across the entire profession, whether you believe us or not, we simply hate dirty police officers.

The truth is, police officers are human. Just like you, they can make mistakes. Despite their humanity, the highest standards of accountability are paramount. However, accountability must be a two-way street. Collectively, we must look at incidents objectively and assign blame fairly. If we approach our future with a willingness to walk in “each other’s shoes,” and learn from our mistakes, the progress we can achieve is endless. Through understanding, true change is possible.

Behind my badge is a heart like yours. In the end, we all want the same things.

I hope you see, we really are more alike, than we are different.

The Officer Next Door

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