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Law Enforcement 1

“No-Knock” Search Warrants Are Not the Enemy, Violent Criminals With Guns Are

police-entry-warrantless

I won’t speculate on how the search warrant in Houston was carried out in regards to tactical specifics. Did they hit lights and sirens on a patrol car? Did they scream “Police!” as they were making entry? I don’t know. At this point, even that aspect of that tragedy is convoluted with no concrete answers on what transpired. Needless to say, there’s no point in speculating and making a bad situation worse. Immediately after the tragedy, comments were made about “stopping no-knock warrants” in Houston by Chief Acevedo. A typical response by a Chief scrambling to appease the masses. I could elaborate for pages abouit that topic, however, this article is simply aimed at explaining the two methods of search warrant executions, that’s all.

This topic is inherently controversial, even amongst police officers. It’s similar to a Chevy vs Ford debate in the sense that it comes down to personal preference and opinion, except it gets much more heated. Why? I think because some people are adamant that one method is more dangerous than the other. Other police officers make the argument you can get shot, or end up shooting someone, regardless of which method is used. Either way, I’ll do my best to explain every aspect of search warrants without writing a book and let the fiery debates and arguments begin!

SEARCH WARRANT BASICS

I have just over three years of personal experience writing and executing narcotics search warrants, so this article is written solely based on that experience and does not reflect current policies or procedures as they may have changed. It’s also important to understand that every agency has their own way of writing and executing search warrants. Depending on their training, department policies, the district attorney’s office, or simply preference in style, search warrants will generally vary to some degree from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Having said that, every search warrant is the same, in that it must have a few basic necessities in order to be signed by a judge. First and foremost, it must articulate probable cause that a crime has been or is being committed and the search warrant in which you are applying for, is seeking permission to go somewhere and search for evidence that relates to that specific crime.

So for the purposes of discussing narcotics search warrants, most evidentiary warrants I wrote, sought permission to enter a residence and search for narcotics. The warrant was based on the fact that either I or a confidential informant purchased narcotics from that residence. There are other methods but for the purposes of this article, that is all I’ll cover.

At this point, all search warrants are the same, in that they will simply describe in great detail the location they intend to search, the person(s) (if known) they believe are in care, custody, and control of the residence, and it will detail why you think there are drugs being sold from the residence.

“KNOCK AND ANNOUNCE” WARRANTS

The one way search warrants differ, is whether or not you as the lead detective would add a “no knock clause” in the search warrant. In simple terms, this clause, if GRANTED by the Judge, allows the entry team to go to the residence and immediately begin working on the making entry into the residence. On the contrary, a warrant without a “no knock clause” would have to be executed in a normal “knock and announce” fashion. This is the “default” way a warrant will be executed.

A “knock and announce” search warrant, means that the officers executing the search warrant do not believe there is any exigency in entering the residence quickly. For example, if they are searching for a murder suspect, or evidence that cannot be destroyed, there is no exigency for an entry team to quickly get inside. Additionally, if it is the belief that knocking and announcing their presence would NOT endanger the police officers in any way, then they would not include a “no knock” clause in their warrant.

This warrant would be executed by showing up, surrounding the residence, and announcing their presence with directions for anyone inside to exit the residence. The warrant team would take up positions of cover and wait a “reasonable” amount of time for anyone to exit the residence. Eventually, if there is no answer, they will go ahead and make entry into the residence. A slow and methodical search for the person or evidence they are seeking will be conducted, with or without the consent of anyone inside.

THE “NO-KNOCK” WARRANT EXPLAINED

A “no knock” clause would be added and applied for, if any of the previously mentioned details were different. If the lead detective felt knocking and announcing their presence, waiting an undetermined “reasonable amount of time” to allow people to exit the residence, would hinder their investigation or create a more dangerous situation for the officers, a no-knock clause would be included in the search warrant. This clause is subject to approval by the reviewing judge or magistrate and could be denied.

Examples of why a “no knock” clause would be applied for include but are not limited to: The drugs being sold inside the residence could be easily and readily destroyed. Drug dealers utilize multiple methods to destroy their drugs quickly in the event the police show up. This would have to be articulated in detail for example they have a constant open flame, a hot plate with oil, or they sell out of the bathroom next to a toilet. Other factors include the residence being heavily barricaded with cages, which means it will take a significant amount of time to gain entry (element of surprise is gone). There are cameras that will likely tip off the drug dealers that the entry team is there (element of surprise is gone). Guns and other weapons have been observed inside the drug house, or any other articulable facts that a reasonable person would believe that standing outside the residence, announcing their presence and waiting for the occupants to surrender, would either allow for the destruction of evidence or potentially pose a greater threat to the officers as they wait to be allowed inside.

It’s important to note that even in a “no-knock” warrant situation, the likelihood that suspected drug dealers do not see the police coming or are not somehow alerted, is slim to none in most instances. Drug dealers go to great lengths to give themselves the best chance to destroy evidence, or flee the residence in hopes of not being arrested. This is their job. They plan for the possibility of getting caught and do everything in their power to avoid it.

THE DEBATE

This is where the debate among police officers and citizens alike gets hairy. Some police officers feel that no amount of drugs are “worth their life” and therefore, any method other than a “no knock” warrant should be employed in order to catch the violent drug dealers that plague our streets with drugs and related violence. Others, feel it is a worthy cause and that warrants no matter how they are executed, carry risk.

I think when it comes to the public and maybe some police officers who haven’t executed these kinds of warrants themselves, the common misconception is that a “no knock” warrant means nothing is being said, no warning or announcement is given while entry is being made. This couldn’t be FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH.

During a “no-knock” search warrant execution, upon reaching the doorway or caged door of the drug house in question, the second they begin working on breaking open the door or removing caged barricades, the entire entry team begins announcing their presence by yelling “Police!” At this point, the secret is out, they are there and they are coming in.

The main difference in “no-knock” versus “knock and announce” is the officers are authorized to immediately work on making entry (break down or open caged doors or barricades) once they arrive and immediately enter without waiting for people to surrender on their own.

Most of these houses are not “houses” as you think of them. Many of them are “trap houses” that may be rented by someone and outfitted to solely sell narcotics from them. They don’t have furniture, beds, dishes, etc. They have heavily barricaded doors and windows, hidden compartments, and maybe an air mattress or a couch where the drug dealers hang out and play video games while they wait for their next customer. It’s a business folks, they protect it by any means necessary.

I hope this explains “knock and announce” vs “no-knock” and dispels some rumors or myths about how they are obtained and more importantly explains how they are executed.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

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Law Enforcement 24

Houston Police Chief Prematurely Alleges Officers Lied To Obtain Search Warrant, Causes Widespread Controversy and Anger

SWAT breaching door

Let me start by saying, I disagree with how Chief Acevedo has handled this incident. Before the completion of the investigation, he has publicly stated he believes there were “mistruths” in the search warrant affidavit. Then Chief Acevedo doubled down and said, “I’m very confident that we’re going to have criminal charges on one or more police officers,” according to an article from NPR.

Such allegations are concerning, no doubt.

However, he could have simply stated: “As with every police involved shooting, we are conducting an extensive internal investigation into this incident. We are also reviewing the narcotics investigation that precluded the execution of the search warrant to ensure everything was done properly. I can assure the citizens of Houston, IF any criminal misconduct or policy violations are found, they will be handled swiftly and properly. Any criminal charges or administrative discipline deemed necessary, will be forth coming once the internal investigation is COMPLETED.”

Boom. Done. Simple.

Then we wait and see what happens. If misconduct is found, file charges, issue terminations, announce it, and be transparent at that time.

Instead, he released detailed allegations that are potentially criminal in nature. I disagree with this approach. You can be transparent and promote accountability without throwing your troops under the bus BEFORE an investigation is completed.

Continuing his tornado of knee-jerk statements, Chief Acevedo stated the Houston Police Department will no longer use “no-knock” search warrants, in a heated meeting with a group of activists and members of the public.

The method of HOW they served the warrant was NOT the reason bad things happened. The shooting could have still taken place if different search warrant tactics were used. The fact remains, the people inside the house decided to shoot at police officers.

Remember how the Chief stated this all transpired in an article dated January 28, 2019, in USA TODAY:

“Suspects opened fire as soon as officers breached the door at a residence in southeast Houston, Police Chief Art Acevedo said at an evening press conference. Two suspects died at the scene from police gunfire, but Acevedo said police do not know how many suspects shot at police.

About a dozen narcotics officers and six patrol officers, Acevedo said, were at the scene to serve the warrant and provide support to investigate the sale of black tar heroin. Officers breached the front door just before 5 p.m. local time while announcing themselves and hitting the siren and lights on a patrol car.”

However, that has all changed, because on Monday, February 18th, an article from the New York Times stated the following:

“Chief Acevedo stated the Police Department would largely end the practice of forcibly entering homes to search them without warning as officers did the evening of the deadly raid. Moving forward, he said that if officers want to use the tactic, known as no-knock warrants, they would need his permission.”

Without warning? I thought they announced themselves while breaching the door, hitting the lights and siren on a patrol car? I don’t know about you, but to me, that is warning.

Yelling: “Police! Search warrant!” + Siren noise = warning. Not to mention it was 5 p.m., not exactly dark out. I can only imagine they were wearing articles of clothing and/or body armor with the word “POLICE” clearly displayed on them.

So why is this such a debacle? Maybe because Acevedo rushes in front of the cameras to say ANYTHING at all, in hopes of appeasing the public. By doing so, he makes himself and the Houston Police Department look foolish. No one likes flip-flopping. Wait for the facts, it isn’t that difficult.

Search warrant tactical debates aside, I see nothing wrong with saying the following: IF the Houston narcotics detective(s) lied, cut corners, fabricated facts, or did anything untruthful to obtain the search warrant, they deserve to be punished.

If you have a problem with me saying that, fine. Don’t follow me or read my articles. I started this website to tell the truth about policing from an officer’s perspective. My main goal is fighting false and inflammatory narratives that exist today, making police officers’ jobs more dangerous.

The very same narratives that lead to people becoming radicalized and killing my co-workers in Dallas, Texas on July 7th, 2016, or days after in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

That is why I say if wrong, they deserve to be punished.

The public needs to hear that statement.

This isn’t me saying ANYONE is guilty, anyone lied, or speculating before an investigation is complete. It is an “IF THEN” statement. IF wrong, THEN punish them. IF they did nothing wrong, THEN they should be vindicated. Presumed innocent, until proven guilty like anyone else.

It’s the Chief’s fault for releasing such detailed allegations this early, while the detective was still in the hospital. His statements and the specificity of them, are the reason the controversy about truthfulness exists.

Part of fighting the false narrative of  “thin blue line of cover-ups” involves admitting mistakes, accepting responsibility for poor decisions, and denouncing behavior that is detrimental to police officers’ reputations. This needs to be done regularly and doesn’t suggest we can’t fight false accusations or stand behind an officer when they are in the right.

In today’s society, if you remain silent about something even POTENTIALLY negative, the masses assume you condone it. It’s that simple.

Put simply, a dishonest police officer has wide spread, long lasting, negative ramifications on the entire profession.

Recently, the FBI announced they are conducting an investigation collaboratively, yet independently, into the search warrant and possible civil rights violations.

As I mentioned, I have multiple follow up articles planned regarding this incident and related topics.

They include: Search warrants – “no-knock” versus “knock announce” how they differ and the pros and cons about each of them, the myths about the “THIN BLUE LINE OF SILENCE”, and lastly, how knee jerk policy changes by police chiefs simply attempt to appease the public but do more harm than good.

So stay tuned and feel free to subscribe for email notifications when an article is published.

As always, thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 1

“Police Shoot Unarmed Man!” The False Narrative of an Epidemic, Proven Wrong By The Numbers

Accountablity

Below are the statistics of fatal officer involved shootings according to a Washington Post study that began in 2015.

These statistics and this article serve as the foundation for topics I plan to discuss in the future.

Fatal police shootings, unarmed fatal police shootings, race as it relates to fatal police shootings, and lastly, the media’s coverage of such tragic events.

Highly contested topics, no doubt. But topics I feel need to be addressed, despite the expected backlash from trolls, anti-police haters, and career criminals. They will likely come out of the woodwork, spew hate in a feeble attempt to feel better about themselves. That’s fine, their hate and how it plays into the cycle of violence in America will be discussed in a future article.

Here are the numbers broken down by year, race, and a second set of numbers focused ONLY on the unarmed fatal shootings:

Shooting Stats Photo3

A few things to note regarding the unarmed shooting statistics.

The Washington Post does a great job of taking their data collection one step further when classifying these incidents. They track subcategories regarding unarmed shootings which are, “attack in progress” and “mental illness.”

These contributing factors alone do not justify the officer’s actions. That is NOT what I am suggesting. However, it usually adds context as to why the incident took place and could justify the shooting.

For example, the unarmed statistics include people who were reported to have fought police, attempted to take their gun, or reached into their waistband or jacket. Though tragic, this could justify the officer’s actions in most cases. And certainly changes the perception that these people did nothing at all to cause the shooting to occur.

I can already hear the haters.

“Fighting the police shouldn’t be a death sentence!”

I agree. I wish it never happened. I wish people never fought the police. I wish the police never had to shoot anyone. Wouldn’t that be a great society to live in?

Unfortunately, that is not reality.

This does not excuse officers who use deadly force unjustifiably. Nor does it negate people’s bad decisions to fight police, attempt to disarm police, or disobey commands and reach into their waistband. The police didn’t force them to make such horrible decisions, they simply reacted to it.

Unfortunately, this line of thinking, suggests we are being rational and honest when assigning blame for what transpired. A difficult task in a country fueled on media headlines and emotion. People who refuse to read an article and gathering facts before simply taking a headline as gospel, good, bad, or otherwise.

Somehow it is lost on some people, if you don’t fight the police, you’ll likely be lumped into the 60+ million annual encounters between police and citizens where NOTHING bad happens. Yes, as of 2015, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, 60+ million encounters occur annually between police and citizens every year.

Lastly, and most importantly, a narrative exists that suggests police shooting unarmed people has become an “epidemic” in America. The narrative suggests that the trend is increasing or worsening.

However, a quick review of these statistics collected by a third party, a presumably unbiased news source nonetheless, would suggest otherwise.

In fact, it appears to suggest the opposite, a downward trend since 2015 in unarmed shootings by police in America. Interesting to say the least. You would think this would be good news. Fewer shootings, less tragedy. But yet the media remains silent, waiting for the next possibility to stir controversy through headlines.

The new rhetoric and sentiment remain, “the police are the enemy.”

More on this, the media, and related topics to come.

Be safe and thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 3

Slaying The Stigma

Adversity

I just want to be real with you.  I understand why cops are killing themselves.  I understand because I have been all the way to the end of that dark, desolate road.  The only difference, the only saving grace, the only thing that saved me in that moment—was a fellow officer who gave me a mission of hope.

The voices whispered into my thoughts, “just end it all…this life…there’s no point..there is no hope…with all the darkness you have seen…with the wretch of a person you have become..there is no hope for you.

Lies.  But I almost believed them.  And in that moment, I received a sneak preview of Hell itself.  Though I had begun to refuse to acknowledge the existence of a higher power, in my heart I still clung to a belief in a Creator..and Heaven…and Hell.

A grizzly, gruff Lieutenant in my department recognized my despair and heard my plea for help one day.  I was in the midst of an internal investigation and I was convinced my career was over, my wife would leave me, and my daughter would be taken from me.

Drowning in alcohol abuse, depression, rage, and darkness, I could see no hope—no way out.  I asked my Lieutenant, “How am I supposed to deal with this? I don’t know what to do.”  I was cautious not to let him see how much I was hurting inside—that I was crying out for help.  I didn’t want him to know the true pain in my heart, for I was so ashamed that I wasn’t tough like him.

Before I knew it, my Lieutenant had made a call to our department’s police psychologist and had given my name and number over to the “Cop Doc.”  Now, I felt like I had a directive from my leader—Go get help. 

Soon, I found made my first appointment with the Cop Doc.  I found myself sitting in a rickety chair in a small office in an old townhouse that had been converted for commercial use.  The soft noise from a noise making machine drowned any conversation in the tiny office from leaking through the paper thin hollow door.  Through heavy tears, I poured out my soul to this man who was supposed to be the enemy…this supposed “quack;” the police psychologist.

The Cop Doc let me finish, he listened and he acknowledged my pain.  He did not try to minimize it, and he did not brush it off or tell me to “tough it out, suck it up.”  The Cop Doc was the perfect balance of reality, compassion, and understanding.  He walked with me through the darkness and he pulled me out of the bottom of the deepest, darkest pit I have ever been in.  Slowly, I put my armor back on.

In the weeks that followed, the Cop Doc allowed me to text him directly and treated me as a friend and not a patient.  He never wrote anything down and he assured me that all we discussed was completely confidential.   He was my only friend at a time when I had none.

Soon afterwards, I began attending church and committed my life to God.  But I kept going to see the Cop Doc; I knew he could help me.  For the first time in so, so long, I felt hope.  To this day, I still have a relationship with my Cop Doc, and I am thankful for his friendship and for the simple fact that he will always stand by my side.

Today, I am a survivor.  My life is back on track, and I’m still a cop.  I love my job and I love helping people and making a difference every day.  I still face the darkness and the impossibilities of this job, but the new light shining from within me will never be extinguished.  My fellow brothers and sisters, we MUST DESTROY the STIGMA.  We are NOT weak if we ask for help.  We are all human and we are all broken.

Your badge is a shield, but it will not shield you from the trauma and the darkness we face.  We must seek help when we are hurting, and we must surround ourselves with a support network that will always uplift us and extend a lifeline of hope when we find ourselves in troubled waters.  Seeking help is the only weapon we have against the enemy of suicide.

Read the powerful true story of how my life was changed forever in my award winning book, Break Every Chain: A Police Officer’s Battle with Alcoholism, Depression, and Devastating Loss, and the True Story of How God Changed His Life Forever.  Available at Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, Books-A-Million, Walmart, Ebay, and iTunes.  For more information, visit https://JonathanHickory.com

Jonathan Hickory is a Master Police Officer in Charlottesville, Virginia. In his 15 plus years of police experience, Jonathan has mentored and instructed other officers in police driving methods and as a Field Training Officer. Jonathan spent seven years investigating the reconstruction of fatal vehicle crash sites and three years as a motorcycle officer. Jonathan proudly serves as a member of the Police Department’s Peer Support Team providing Critical Incident Stress Management support to fellow officers. He also leads a Life Safety team with The Point Church in Charlottesville and the local chapter of the Fellowship of Christian Peace Officers. Jonathan has been married to his wife Stacy for over 14 years and has two children.

Law Enforcement 3

Preventable MS-13 Murder Happens In NYC Subway

ms13 2
Image source: Facebook

On February 3rd, 2019, a preventable and brutal murder took place on a New York City subway platform involving rival gang members. The suspect who is now in custody, Ramiro Gutierrez, is a suspected MS-13 gang member. The victim is an alleged member of a local “18th Street” gang.

As you will hear in the video, the suspect shoots the victim six times in the face, after a physical altercation on the subway platform. You can see video of the fight and subsequent shooting here *graphic warning*:

As disturbing as this video is, one thing that immediately caught my attention, were reports stating the suspect was out on $2,500 bond when this shooting took place.

$2,500 bond despite being an identified MS-13 gang member!? We give MS-13 gang members $2,500 bond? Wow. Good to know.

But wait, there’s more. Not only is Gutierrez a member of a violent gang, he’s also undocumented and here illegally.

Oh I know. I’m wading into controversial territory here. Dare I mention ICE? You know, the federal agency that some politicians want abolished. As always, I’ll try to stick to the facts, instead of political fodder.

So the question remains, why wasn’t a “detainer” placed on Gutierrez after his arrest in December 2018? That is the standard procedure for someone charged with a felony, with a questionable immigration status. Let alone someone who is a member of an extremely violent gang. It only makes sense. Doesn’t it?

Go figure, that is exactly what happened. But not until he shot someone in the face six times on a crowded New York City subway platform.

According to an article published by ABC7NY, “ICE was one of the law enforcement agencies involved in 26-year-old Ramiro Gutierrez’s burglary arrest in December but then did not confirm that he was undocumented so he was freed on bail.”

Of course, the article goes on to say, “Only after his arrest earlier this week for the fatal shooting did ICE determine “he entered without inspection” at an unknown prior date. ICE has now placed a detainer on Gutierrez for possible deportation.”

So there’s the proof that this is what normally happens. It begs the question, why didn’t it happen in December 2018?

Political interference? Political pressure on ICE? ICE dropped the ball? I’m not above saying law enforcement could have made a mistake. Considering ICE was involved with the arrest in December 2018, the reason for not issuing a detainer at that time has to be an interesting one to say the least. There has to be an explanation or reason. Maybe we will get one, maybe not? We can speculate until the cows come home.

I don’t expect the judicial system to be perfect. I certainly realize people arrested for crimes have a right to be freed on bond before trial. I also recognize someone arrested for minor or non-violent crimes could be freed on bond and proceed to go on a murderous crime spree. We aren’t fortune tellers. If we were, we could prevent all crime.

I guess the question becomes, when do we take the criminal element seriously and put our safety above political cries to be lenient? I said my goal wasn’t to be political, doesn’t mean it’s entirely avoidable. I can’t help but wonder if political pressure played a role in the release of Gutierrez in December 2018.

Let me put it simply. If someone is arrested for a felony, AND they are identified as an active criminal street gang member, AND they aren’t here legally, that is PRECISELY when ICE should be involved and allowed to do their job. If their immigration status is cleared up, then and only then, should bond or bail even be entertained.

I believe this murder could have been prevented. The problem with certain political policies, especially those of lenience, is they have to be applied uniformly. Being concerned about bail being too expensive and disproportionately affecting the poor or minorities, makes sense, I get it. It’s certainly an issue worthy of discussion and future corrective action.

However, given the mitigating circumstances involving Mr. Gutierrez, certain procedures should have been followed preventing his release. This particular case isn’t about race, ethnicity, or financial status, it’s about criminality. When you are a member of a criminal street gang, you deserve to be treated like one.

Allowing MS-13 gang members who aren’t even here legally, back into society on a $2,500 bond is insane. It isn’t racist to keep MS-13 gang members locked up, it’s smart. Especially for felony charges. We aren’t talking about jaywalking or littering.

Violent people shouldn’t be afforded the opportunity to continue their violence in our society. Period.

Luckily, the only person killed in this horrific incident was another alleged gang member and not an innocent person in the NYC subway system. Despite that, I can’t help but feel bad they had to witness such a heinous act. Especially considering it could and should have been prevented.

No matter who is at fault.

It’s a damn shame.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 3

Police Playing Russian Roulette? Wait Before You Speculate.

Katlyn Alix.jpg

By now most people who follow the news have likely heard the tragic story out of St. Louis, where 24 year-old police officer, Katlyn Alix, was shot and killed by a colleague of hers, while allegedly playing a game of “Russian roulette.”

I have waited a few days to discuss this befuddling tragedy, like most, I was in disbelief  when this story broke.

I want to believe the officer who fired the fatal shot is telling the truth, but I’m not naïve and usually when something doesn’t sound right, it isn’t. Maybe it is the cold hard truth? Maybe not? There’s likely more to the story, but I won’t speculate, for good reason.

That being said, in all my time in law enforcement, I know one thing to be true, you’ve never, “seen it all.” I remember times while writing arrest reports exactly how the arrest happened thinking to myself, “There’s no way anyone will believe this report, this is insane.”  But it was the truth. Sometimes things happen that are nothing short of bonkers and hard to believe. Thank goodness for body cameras, at least now the craziness can be recorded.

Am I outwardly saying that Officer Hendren and his roommate, also a police officer, are lying? No. I’m simply saying we don’t have the entire story right now and this story seems hard to believe. Maybe because we don’t want to believe that officers could be this stupid. They of all people should know better, so that naturally creates disbelief.

Either way, we need to wait. Unfortunately, that’s how our system works. The trial will reveal the facts and I’m sure that between now and then, more information will be released when appropriate.

Let’s not forget that the two police officers who were on-duty when this happened, have been charged with serious crimes. Protecting the integrity of the case for prosecution is paramount in order to have a fair and effective trial.

This holds true whether police officers are charged with a crime, or a citizen. However, in today’s world, everyone demands ANSWERS NOW! This short-sighted behavior needs to stop. There’s a process in place for a reason and that reason is to seek justice no matter who is on trial, potentially dirty police, an alleged drug dealer or gang member, or a citizen. The process is the same every time, as it should be.

It doesn’t matter who is on trial. The process must be done the same way and with integrity to allow the system to work the best way it can. And no, the system isn’t perfect, but that’s an entirely different subject.

This case is similar to the highly publicized incident in Dallas, Texas involving former Dallas Officer Amber Guyger who came home from work and killed someone she thought was in her apartment. Come to find out, she was in the right apartment, but on the wrong floor. A tragic mistake to say the least.

All of the facts surrounding that case are yet to be made public, but rest assured, the rumors and nonsense have swirled. Why not just wait for the actual facts to come out? Why speculate or spread rumors that there were ulterior motives? Hidden relationships? Or other ridiculous allegations that are nothing but that, allegations. What does that do to help the situation? I’ll tell you, nothing.

I guess we are a society that demands and expects instant answers and gratification. Patience, a virtue according to the most, seems to be a thing of the past. Try sitting at a green light for more than 0.2 seconds after it changes. You’re sure to get honked at and told you are number one. Pretty shameful if you ask me. Relax. Life’s a game you’re bound to finish, so calm down. 

So what’s my point? There’s a few.

This story seems odd, maybe it really happened the way they say it did, maybe it didn’t. Time will tell. Thankfully, the officers involved who appear to be responsible for this tragedy, have been charged and the process of seeking truth and justice are in motion.

Let me say that again for the anti-police haters, the internet trolls, the people who think police support pages and police officers blindly support police officers no matter what, THANKFULLY THE OFFICERS INVOLVED WHO APPEAR TO BE RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS TRAGEDY, HAVE BEEN CHARGED AND THE PROCESS OF SEEKING TRUTH AND JUSTICE ARE IN MOTION. (I’ve had my share of trolls and haters on social media lately, but I doubt they’re listening, this doesn’t fit their narrative).

I recognize this may be hard to understand, but no police officer wants bad police officers to be employed and active. What good do bad police officers do for anyone? Nothing. It ruins police and community relations and makes the job of the good officers harder. It’s that simple folks.

Had this officer played “Russian roulette” and killed a civilian, my feelings would be the same. If the officer is wrong, fire him and lock him up. If a jury decides he isn’t culpable, then so be it.

Unfortunately, the wheels of justice are slow. Until they turn completely and all the details come to light, we can only wait. But we should wait in silence. Let the case play out, let the facts be sought, gathered, and shared when necessary. Spreading rumors and adding your own speculation across the internet does nothing positive or beneficial.

This was nothing short of a PREVENTABLE tragedy and for that, we should be upset.

May justice be served and Officer Alix never forgotten.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 8

Thugs With Guns Talk About Killing Police (Video)

chicago thug guns
Video and Photo via Chicago Code BLUE Facebook page

 

Watch this video and tell me police officers are not targets.

Watch this video and afterward, explain how you truly think police officers are the problem in society.

Watch this video and tell me officers act on fake fear, despite having encountered people in cars just like this and lived to tell about it.

After watching this video, realize this, that officer didn’t know what was next to him, just like officers don’t know who they’re dealing with on a call, a traffic stop, or simply walking to get lunch.

After watching this video, realize if that officer pulled that car over, you’d likely read about an officer involved shooting, or worse an officer killed.

Who is to blame for this? The officer? Or the thug with a gun?

Remember, had there been a shooting, the news media would be quick to post photos of the kids holding those pistols, wearing church clothes, being hugged by their Moms.

Mom would tell the country via the news media her son wasn’t, “A bad kid, he was a good little boy.”

Meanwhile, the police officer can’t speak to the media.

On social media, the officer is made out to be a racist, blood thirsty killer, who manufactured fear, so they could shoot another innocent person.

This will simply further the hate toward law enforcement, making the target on their back bigger. A vicious cycle, that likely won’t be broken, due to society choosing the false narrative over the truth.

It makes no sense.

Yet this seems to be the narrative that is winning:

Police are bad.

Gang members are misunderstood.

Gun laws keep “bad people” from having guns.

The police need to step up and do more, without hurting anyone.

Impossible. Irrational. Irresponsible.

Fight the false narrative with truth.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 4

It’s Been Over Two Years, What Has Kneeling Changed?

Kap Kneeling
Colin Kaepernick, right, and Eric Reid kneeling during the national anthem before an N.F.L. game last year. Credit Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press

The controversy surrounding Colin Kaepernick kneeling during the national anthem continues years later as we head toward Super Bowl LIII on February 3, 2019.

A petition calling for performers Maroon5, Big Boi, and Travis Scott on change.org to drop out of performing the Super Bowl halftime show, has now surpassed 100,000 signatures.

The petition which is titled, “Maroon5: Drop Out of the Super Bowl Halftime Show” has been gaining steam in the last few days, refueling the controversy around Kaepernick, the NFL, and the kneeling movement.

A possible secondary goal of simply kneeling during the performance, appeared in a petition update posted by organizer Vic Oyedeji today.

The update includes a link that if clicked, allows you to share a pre-written “tweet” that reads as follows, “@Maroon5, @trvisXX and @BigBoi: #TakeAKnee during your set. Show the hundreds of millions of people watching that you stand in solidarity with @Kaepernick7 and all players who protect police brutality.”

I can only speculate the petition organizer realizes it is unlikely at this point the performers will drop out, so a secondary goal of kneeling during the performance would suffice to spread their message.

So what do I think about it?

I support the ability of anyone to peacefully protest. With that, I have no issue. No one should. I am confused and have long been confused, as to how the act of kneeling will curb or prevent future acts of alleged, “police brutality.” It’s not lost on me that discussions about the topic may be one of his goals, clearly, that goal has been achieved.

I don’t condone police brutality.

Police officers don’t condone police brutality.

Anything involving police brutality or instances of obvious police misconduct, do nothing but make the job of hardworking, honest, police officers harder. With every instance of bad press and embarrassing mistakes, the divide between society and police officers becomes deeper.

This helps no one.

To suggest that police officers today actively support fellow officers with bad intentions is lunacy. The notion of a “thin blue line” covering up misconduct seems even more irrational now than ever, with the implementation of body worn cameras.

Speaking of body worn cameras, nearly every single police officer I know, who wears a body camera, loves them. Why? Because they can operate as they always have, without fear of being lied on. Think it doesn’t happen? Google, “False rape allegation DPS Trooper,” and read how devastating false allegations can be. Not to mention the damage it did to those who only read headlines and failed to see the follow up stories that it was in fact, a blatant lie. The damage is still done, sadly.

If Maroon5, drops out or decides to kneel during their halftime performance, so be it. It will appease some of their fans, maybe anger others who believe that police officers, by and large, do a great job.

No profession is absent of misconduct. It is standard logic that goes without saying. The difference is police officers bear a great responsibility of power and the ability to take a life. Therefore, we hear about their every misstep, on or off-duty. Rightfully so. The old, “held to a higher standard,” adage we hear surrounding police officers will ring true forever. As it should.

So the question is, “What can we do to have a police force worthy of praise in the eyes of Kaepernick and his supporters?”

Is there an attainable and tangible goal we could set and work toward?

Or are we failing to realize that as long as police officers are human beings, we will never have perfection.

Realizing an unattainable level of perfection and supporting a goal of striving for it, are two separate things.

I don’t have all the answers. I certainly would have told the world by now, if I did.

I know one side of the issue involves compliance on behalf of those interacting with police officers. However, it seems society these days is less interested in saying, “That guy could have simply put his hands behind his back, or not pointed that gun, or not swung at the officer, and he’d be alive today.” That too, is a tragedy in my opinion. If we are a society of fairness, we should consider all angles when assessing blame or causation.

I guess we will see what happens on February 3rd.

Ultimately, I hope people reading this realize one thing, police officers want to be perfect.

Any officer who blatantly breaks the law or abuses their power deserves to be fired, and if warranted, sent to prison. It’s that simple. I’ll say it again, police officers want to be perfect. It would make life so much better for everyone.

Damn the humanity.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 0

Colorado Avalanche Not Afraid To Honor The 148 Fallen Police Officers of 2018

The Colorado Avalanche recently honored the 148 heroic police officers who paid the ultimate sacrifice protecting and serving their communities in 2018.

During the pre-game activities, they displayed the thin blue line flag across the entire ice surface and honored those who gave their life protecting their communities with a moment of silence. See a video from The Brotherhood for the Fallen Aurora below.

 

Initially, I was thrilled to see this video. I think anyone who supports law enforcement would be. Then I remembered the new “movement” that suggests the thin blue line flag is controversial and racist. I worried that this show of support would be spun into something it wasn’t meant to be, racist.

Due to this, I searched the internet and social media for any signs of outrage or controversy, thankfully, to my knowledge, there isn’t any.

For those of you who follow me on social media, I recently addressed the controversy surrounding the “thin blue line” flag and other anti-police issues, on The Officer Next Door Facebook page. Needless to say, it attracted plenty of haters, but I feel the message was important.

Unfortunately, the thin blue line flag has been deemed by some, as a “symbol or racism” due to the fact, it was displayed at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, back in 2017. Needless to say, the thin blue line flag being present at an ignorant event like that, repulses me. I’m sure I can speak for all of law enforcement when I say that.

However, I also hope our society wouldn’t allow the actions of a few misguided hillbillies, the ability to represent a profession that includes nearly 1 million people across the country. It seems a little short-sighted to me, but I digress.

People who don’t represent law enforcement, shouldn’t represent the beliefs of law enforcement. I can stand in a public place waving a flag that says, “Firefighters hate puppies.” It doesn’t mean it’s true, or represents the views of firefighters across America.

I also recognize the argument by some, that altering the flag in any way is “divisive” or “offensive”. I guess we will just have to agree to disagree on that one. I know plenty of police officers that also served in our military.  They don’t seem to have an issue with the thin blue line flag.  I believe they see it for what it is, a flag that represents law enforcement being the “thin blue line” that stands between the evil in our country and the rest of America. That’s it. Nothing more.

Clearly, the Colorado Avalanche were not deterred by the possibility of angering the anti-police crowd who believe the flag is something it is not. Kudos to them for honoring the fallen. There’s no harm in that. For once, maybe people saw the gesture solely for what it was, a show of support for those who died protecting our country. Nothing more, nothing less.

The NHL has long been an example of class, when it comes to honoring law enforcement. Back in 2016, the Dallas Stars were allowed to wear decals on their helmets as show of support, following the tragic deaths of five police officers who were directing traffic at a protest march on July 7, 2016.

https://twitter.com/DallasStars/status/786548871732142081/photo/1

I chose the words, “allowed to wear” on purpose, due to the fact the NFL did not allow the Dallas Cowboys to do the same. Say what you want about sports leagues, they certainly have the right to support who they want, but it seems pretty evident the NHL gets it right. Every. Single. Time.

What a breath of fresh (cold) air.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

 

 

 

Law Enforcement 4

Police Officers Will Keep Dying For You

side by side

Those who follow law enforcement news, already know 2019 got off to a tragic start.

Recently, two young female officers, both only 22 years-old, were gunned down in back to back days, each with less than one year of service to their community.

Any police officer being killed is tragic, however, I think we can agree that young, vibrant, and beautiful women getting shot and killed is difficult to stomach. Call me old fashioned, it just seems more egregious.

As the tragic news comes out and social media is a buzz, inevitably, someone asks, “Why does this keep happening?”

I’ll tell you why.

It will keep happening, because brave men and women get up every single day, strap on a bulletproof vest, kiss their loved ones goodbye, and head to work knowing they may not make it back.

It will keep happening, not because it’s “what they signed up for,” but because despite that, they took the oath anyway.

It will keep happening, because police officers are the “thin blue line” that stands between the evil in our society and the rest of us.

It will keep happening, because police officers do more than write speeding tickets and take reports. They confront unknown dangers, violent gang members, and armed drug dealers.

It will keep happening, because there are people in the world that don’t value life. There is evil among us, willing to kill a police officer in hopes avoiding accountability for their criminal acts.

It will keep happening, because police officers confront violent members of society every day, not knowing they’re dealing with, what their intentions are, or what they plan to do.

It will keep happening, because when bullets fly, all hell breaks loose, or tragedy strikes, the police run toward it, while everyone else runs away.

It will keep happening, because despite the tragedy, heartache, or the pain of losing brothers and sisters in blue, they will continue to show up when called, holding the line, keeping you safe.

It will keep happening, because when police officers are cut, bruised, bleeding, or injured, they keep fighting, even if in the end, it costs them everything.

It will keep happening, because police officers are sheepdogs. Sheepdogs live to protect the sheep from the wolves, it’s innate, it’s in their blood.

It will keep happening, because police officers are human and under that vest is a servant’s heart. They’re no different than you or me, but they’re programmed to serve others no matter the cost.

It will keep happening, because the spirit of police officers can’t be broken, the bond is too strong, the family too close, the brotherhood and sisterhood too real.

Some days are quiet and go by fast, others they see things that will haunt them forever.

Police work is a calling. They’re drawn to it because being a police officer is more than a job, it’s a lifestyle. It’s a way of life. A desire to be a part of something bigger than yourself.

As we go forward, remember why, “it will keep happening” and support the men and women who run toward the things everyone else runs from.

Gone, but never forgotten.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Personal Perspective 0

Tired Of Sadness and Tragedy? Try this article on for size.

pointing

People complain about the negativity in the news and on social media all the time. Yet, little do they know, it’s their fault. I bet if I titled this article something mundane like, “Tragedy Sells” or “Tragedy Rules the Media” it’d get passed over even more than with the current title. In fact, I’ve written a similar article before, it garnered very little readership, so we will see how this one goes.

I recently saw an officer comment on social media something like, “We were on our way to serve a warrant looking for a murder suspect, we had our heavy gear on, helmets, and as we were headed toward the target location, multiple voices could be heard saying things like, ‘Be careful!’ and ‘Protect yourself!’” The officer went on to say how much that meant in that moment. It’s the little things.

All too often police only hear criticism for “wearing militarized equipment” or “looking too aggressive,” as if to suggest police officers should go into situations being outgunned and under protected. That kind of rhetoric is sheer nonsense. But that’s a whole other axe to grind.

Back to the topic at hand, people’s love affair with tragedy.

Why do we as a society eat up tragedy with such vigor? A tragic event hits the news and we hit that share button on social media, spreading the word like wildfire. However, ‘mum is the word’ when a positive news story comes out, unless it involves a cute puppy or something funny and worthy of going ‘viral’. It’s sort of a shame.

Two officers have been shot in the last 12 hours, one has died. I haven’t rushed to share either of those stories, despite the fact I know they would garner a large number of “likes” and “shares” which is your ultimate goal running a website.

Why?

I don’t want to constantly be the bearer of bad or tragic news. If I were “greedy” for “likes”, “shares” and “comments,” then I could easily “fall in line” and share the sadness like all the rest. I could bask in the glory of my “website traffic” and “social media reach”. But I hesitate. And maybe it will be the death of The Officer Next Door, who knows? I guess we will see.

I will likely share some “tragedy” from time to time, it comes with the territory, so don’t burn me at the stake the next time it happens. I’m just hoping to have a different priority. A different focus if you will. Maybe I will resort to “falling in line” to surive? I hope not. I guess we will see.

Why do I hesitate to share constant negativity despite the “popularity” that comes with it?

I recently saw another police officer post on social media expressing his desire for a more, “positive police social media group or website”. His point is valid. He spends all day dealing with other people’s problems. He sees tragedy in all forms while at work, the last thing he wants to see when he gets home is more “bad news” on social media. It’s like the bullying crisis we have in our schools today. With social media, it is now possible to be bullied around the clock, not just while at school. Same goes for police officers and their constant bombardment of negativity.

If that officer only knew how badly I want The Officer Next Door to be that “positive and supportive police page”.  Unfortunately, there’s a few problems with that goal.

First, it isn’t easy to come up with stories that are positive. Not because they aren’t happening, they’re just severely under reported. They certainly aren’t self-reported by police officers, I’ve said it many times, they’re too humble to do that.

Second, people don’t tune in to positive. So if you’re a news station, a lowly blogger just trying to spread a message, or someone trying to generate some revenue to do things like donate to police charities, posting and writing stories of positivity sounds great, but nobody will listen. You’ll go broke and basically be talking to yourself.

Half the time, it seems people only read the headline or look at the photo associated with the articles anyway. If they aren’t controversial or sad, they get passed over. I’m still debating what to call this article. I know one thing is for certain, the more controversial or sad I make it, the more readership it will get.

How do I know that we love negativity like we love our apple pie, smart phones, and baseball?

The proof is in the pudding.

I’ve been writing articles on this website for just over six months now. I’ve written articles on a wide variety of police topics. Happy ones, sad ones, thankful ones, short, long, medium ones, news related, original stuff I pulled out of my very own brain, I’ve tried them all.

The most popular? The saddest and most tragic things I can think of, or report on.

You would think social media “groups” or “pages” related to policing would yearn for positivity. I can’t imagine the “non-police” civilian followers on such pages – who no doubt are there to be supportive – enjoy seeing constant negativity either. It has to wear on them like it does our police officers.

So what is my solution? It’s a challenge really.  

Luckily, I’m not just writing to grumble. Unlike most politicians and other ding dongs with a large voice, I present a problem and offer a solution. Novel idea, I know.

Start looking for ways to be a positive supporter of our men and women in blue. Our men and women riding our ambulances, our fire trucks, our military. Any first responder, or public servant. I don’t discriminate.

I challenge you NOT to wait for tragedy, or a “Law Enforcement Appreciation Day” to speak up and recognize someone for their hard work or job well done.

Let’s put a positive spin on the unfortunately necessary catch phrase, “See something, say something!”

If you see something positive, hear something positive, even think of something positive, message me. You can message me on this website via the contact button. You can find The Officer Next Door on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. I have made it rather easy to find me, so please do. I’ll share your positivity as much as I can. Then once I share it, share my posts or article. Use the power of the internet to our advantage.

Just know that I may start posting things that don’t seem as “topic relevant,” especially on my social media pages. I want people to laugh more than they cry. So hang in there if you really enjoy the negativity and sadness.

I hope The Officer Next Door continues to grow and help officers in ways I haven’t even envisioned yet. We shall see.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 5

Seth Meyers’ Disgusting Tweet, Dismisses Victims Murdered By Illegal Immigrants

myers combo photo

I have gone to decent lengths to keep this website and my social media pages relatively free of politics. I say “decent lengths”, because inevitably, some topics related to policing are political. The recent suspension of the Broward County Sheriff, for example. It’s political, yet relevant to policing. So I shared the story with my own thoughts mixed in. That’s what I do.

I have avoided politics for a few reasons.

One, there’s enough negativity and squawking on social media and the mainstream media as it is, you don’t need more from me.

Second, it’s divisive. I didn’t create The Officer Next Door to be divisive, quite the opposite. So it stands to reason I avoid such topics like politics to maintain my goal of marching to a different beat.

But sometimes, you need to go against the grain, or even your own rules. So here it goes. Luckily for you, this is more about optics and respect, than it is “politics” so don’t get too upset with me.

As many of you know, the president addressed the nation last night to address the government shutdown and the issue surrounding the border wall funding.

Apparently while doing so, he mentioned the murder of Ronil Singh, a California police officer killed the night after Christmas by an illegal alien. Trump’s exact words were, “America’s heart broke the day after Christmas when a young police officer in California was savagely murdered in cold blood by an illegal alien, just came across the border. The life of an American hero was stolen by someone who had no right to be in our country. Day after day, precious lives are cut short by those who have violated our borders.”

Much to my dismay, but out of necessity, I covered Singh’s murder extensively as the magnitude of the incident was enormous. For a while, we weren’t sure if the suspect had successfully eluded law enforcement, having little to go on, the sharing of the information we did know seemed vital.

Back to the Meyers debacle. Presumably while the speech was being given and after the murder of Officer Singh and others were mentioned in the president’s speech, Seth Meyers felt the need to tweet the following: “Is this Oval Office: SVU?”

seth meyers

Wow. I get he’s a comedian, I understand he, like many others in Hollywood hate the president, that’s fine. I really don’t care one way or another about your political views. But this sank to a new level of low. Arguably worse than holding a bloody head portrayed to be the president, or destroying a star on the walk of fame in a fit of unabated rage. “Hollywood” has had egg on their face multiple times in the last few years, no doubt.

However, this is different because it involves people that didn’t ask to be victims. It involves people who have suffered great loss and heartache, they aren’t public figures and therefore, don’t deserve to be comedic punching bags.

I can’t imagine the families of the murder victims the president mentioned were laughing. I can’t imagine any police officer across America found his quip funny in any way possible. I can’t fathom why he would find it appropriate to stoop to that level of disgusting.

My point?

This is the sort of rhetoric that does nothing but create division. It isn’t lost on me that ignoring this tweet may have been a good way to deal with it, but I started this website to stand up for law enforcement, not watch as they are marginalized and kicked around like lowly public servants.

What Seth Meyers tweeted was disgusting. There is no other way to put it. Downplaying the fact that a wife lost her husband and a young baby will never know his father, isn’t funny, it’s disgusting.

The fact that Meyers feels so strongly about a political issue or dislikes the president is completely his prerogative. His job as a comedian and public figure, is to make people laugh and be a role model, I think it is fair to say, this tweet fell well short of that goal.

Some things just aren’t funny. Ever. So this isn’t me being “triggered” or being a “snowflake” as some may feel inclined to say.

This is me standing up for the 800,000+ police officers in our country that risk being the next officer killed while simply doing their job. Every. Single. Day.

People being murdered isn’t funny, under any circumstance. It leaves a permanent void in the lives affected by such crimes. Police officers dying in the line of duty is no laughing matter and I can bet the 148 families that lost their loved one in 2018 would agree.

I won’t call for a boycott. I won’t tell you what television shows to watch and who to support politically, but I will tell you when someone has crossed the line.

One can only hope Mr. Meyers apologizes. He owes it to himself and any fans he may have. Maybe by doing so, he can salvage some semblance of dignity after stooping to a new all-time low for Hollywood. An impressive feat at the very least.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 1

The Coward In Broward Out, Sources Say

coward broward

Florida – Multiple reports from various news outlets are reporting that Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel has been suspended by the newly sworn-in Governor Ron DeSantis.

How the Sheriff has lasted this long is beyond me. The way Broward County Deputies handled the Parkland school shooting is one of the most embarrassing and tragic stories surrounding law enforcement in recent history.

Back in November 4, 2013, Sheriff Israel reportedly changed the active shooter policy for the Broward County Sheriff’s Office from “will respond” to “may respond”. This alone should be cause for the removal of Sheriff Israel, as it is clear his policy change cost lives on February 14, 2018.

In a recent interview with Fox News, Jeff Bell, President of the Broward Sheriff’s Office Deputies Association, citing Sheriff Israel’s poor leadership stated, “Broward County Deputies are limited to only four hours of firearms training each year.”

Bell went on to say that due Sheriff Israel’s training policies, “they spend more time in classrooms learning about politeness while policing” than engaging in other training that could better prepares them to do their job.

It is clear, Sheriff Israel has implemented multiple changes to the Broward County Sheriff’s Office that ultimately led to an atrocious and negligent response by his agency on that horrific and tragic day. For these reasons alone, he should have been fired long ago.

After multiple calls to oust Sheriff Israel, even a union “vote of no confidence” where 85% of members voted to get rid of Sheriff Israel, it seems the deputies in Broward County will finally get their wish.

Good riddance Sheriff Israel, though calling you a Sheriff may be giving you too much credit.

We can only hope the new leader takes the department in better and more efficient direction.

The members of the nation’s largest fully accredited Sheriff’s Office in the country deserve it, as do their citizens.

The Officer Next Door

 

Law Enforcement 3

Portland Students Walk Out Of School, Protest Police Officers On Campus

portland school protest
KATU-TV Video Screenshot

Portland, Oregon – In the latest protest in our fair country, a small group of students in Portland, Oregon, walked out of classes Wednesday to protest the presence of police officers assigned to protect the campus, usually referred to as school resource officers, according to KATU-TV.

Roughly 20 students from various Portland public schools walked out of classes and gathered and read a statement prepared by the group of students. In essence, the students are upset about a recent move by the Portland Public School Board that approved a plan to put more SROs on campus every day of the week, instead of four day a week.

The insanity, I know.

What I don’t understand is despite the continued school shooting tragedies across the country, these students are protesting the ONE thing that could help them, in the event pure evil arrives on campus with bad intentions.

Secondly, this may or may not surprise you, many school shootings have been thwarted or ended quickly, due to the actions of SROs on numerous occasions throughout our country. The mainstream media just doesn’t cover those stories as heavily for obvious reasons. They aren’t as tragic as the successful attempts. Therefore, not as profitable. Just telling the truth here folks.

Much like the new movement to keep ‘pointy eared’ puppies from patrolling our airports, police officers are under attack in the latest attempt to remove common sense from how we approach safety in this country. Sadly, common sense ways to keep our children and travelers safe, take a back seat to fighting for policies that won’t hurt anyone’s feelings.

I have a hard time comprehending how these teenagers already dislike police to the point they feel police officers in schools, “further contribute to an environment of fear and distrust,” Sophia Lucas, a senior at Jefferson High School stated before giving the prepared speech.

There was no comment or discussion as to whether the student’s efforts will cause the school board to reconsider their recent move. I can only hope the initial decision to have police officers in schools every day of the week, instead of four, won’t be changed anytime soon. For the sake of Portland area students, their teachers, and their parents. Let police officers do what they do, protect your schools and protect your children.

As always, feel free to share, comment, or discuss this story.

Thank an officer today.

The Officer Next Door

Law Enforcement 1

‘Pointy Eared’ Dogs Too Scary, TSA Says

puppy

In an effort to keep up with the politically correct ways of the world, the Transportation Safety Administration is starting 2019 off with a bang.

The TSA Administrator David Pekoske told the Washington Examiner they will now make a conscious effort to use floppy-eared dogs.

The reasoning behind this move? “We find the passenger acceptance of floppy ear dogs is just better. It presents just a little bit less of concern,” Pekoske stated. “Doesn’t scare the children.”

I recognize dogs can be scary for those who aren’t fans of man’s best friend. However, I find it hard to believe if a child at an airport sees a German Shepherd walking around, it causes widespread panic or fear. I envision quite the opposite, the kid pointing at the dog and telling his parents, “Puppy!”

The important difference here, is according to the Washington Examiner, about one third of the 1,200 TSA canines are used to scan passengers at the airports. The rest are used for scanning baggage and detecting possible explosives. The difference between a Labrador Retriever and a Doberman coming up to smell a person standing in line is palatable.

So the question becomes, “Which breed does the best job and will ensure our safety?” If floppy eared dogs can be effectively utilized to smell people and not scare them, great. If the pointy eared dogs are more effective versus floppy eared dogs, then we have an issue.

What are your thoughts? Are we becoming too “PC”? Should we forge ahead with the floppy eared revolution? Comment below with your thoughts.

The Officer Next Door

 

 

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